Body Worn Cameras (BWC) are a form of tech which improves the working lives of people working in official roles.  Whether it be police officers, security guards, or High Court enforcement agents (as we have in the UK), these professionals are all working to protect someone or something.  The industry is of course now significant as the security industry ramps up its sales to police forces and other industries who want to put the cameras on their operatives.  So we don’t particularly want to get into the specs of the biggest shiniest BWCs out there – there are plenty of tech people who will write about that!

Our offering is about how and when the BWCs come into play, what are the best policies and procedures for using these cameras.  How can organisations who deploy these cameras – which includes Shergroup – ensure that both the person using the BWC and the person(s) who are captured on the video are treated fairly and in accordance the prevailing data laws.

It is this subject – the use of BWCs that has to develop and that we want to discuss.  For us here at Shergroup we take our lead on the use of such technology from the police.  There is no point in trying to re-invent the wheel.  We use this technology everyday and we are now working to develop our policies and procedures in line with support from a consultancy who support the police on the development of standards.

The police in the UK have been using this tech for a number of years and their thinking and development of policies and procedures is going to be first class.  That’s not to say there won’t be gaps – because they will be.  In any emerging technology things crop up which themselves have to be dealt with – the one thing at the moment is capturing the faces of the public at large – rather than a someone suspected of criminal activity.  This is an issue which will have to be contained either by the Information Commissioner’s Office in the UK, or by Government.

But for the moment – and for the purpose of this blog – for those of us outside of modern policing but who look to the police to set standards – that’s the starting point for where and how to develop a BWC policy which is fair and just and which technically serves an organisation and the interests of the public at large.   Let’s start there …..

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